As a financial adviser, I occasionally find myself feeling envious of certain clients. Not because of their wealth — but because of their discipline. They were determined enough to do all the right things which enabled them to accumulate their wealth and, in many cases, retire early. Despite my expertise, I, like a lot of people, sometimes struggle not to do the wrong things that make being rich, let alone retiring at all, a pipe dream.

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Of course, these steps are pushing you towards a rich and successful future, but that doesn’t mean you won’t fail once or twice. You might put your money in an investment and it flops. You might put time towards building your personal brand to have it struggle to get off the ground. But that doesn’t mean you should throw in the towel and give up. These are just small obstacles that you will have to overcome before it gets easier and begins coming more naturally. That being said, prepare to fail. It’s the only way to know what you’re doing right and what you’re doing wrong so you don’t have to make the same mistakes again.

A very well-researched article! Where I live, a quick and easy way to make cash is to teach home tuition to primary schools children. Teachers here aren’t that good so parents are always eager to get children extra help. And parents don’t even care if you have a relevant degree or not. You just need to read the child’s textbook and repeat everything the teacher taught at school and make the kid do his or her homework. How simple for us and how sad for the education system 🙂
Our wage and job-growth information come from the latest edition of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook. The BLS lists “median” wages for jobs rather than “average” wages. The median wage is in the middle of the data set, with half of the jobs paying less and half paying more. BLS job-growth projections are for 2016 to 2026.
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