Now, I know what you’re thinking. Most of the software and apps you use on a regular basis are made by massive companies or established development studios. Well, yes. But many successful apps, particularly those in the Apple and Google stores, are created and marketed by individuals and small businesses. In fact, independent developers made $20 billion in the App Store in 2016 alone.

You may have seen the lists on online; “100 plus ways to make money” quickly or “how to make money fast online”. Most of these lists are merely affiliate link spam. I mean no disrespect to fellow bloggers, but I’m not going to add to the noise and suggest you waste your afternoon on survey sites filling out surveys. If you need money now to cover rent, or get the car fixed, reward apps and sign up bonuses might not cut it.
Choose your niche and check for demand: The golden course combination is when you can find an in-demand niche that aligns with your skills and unique experiences. A great way to do this is to use Google Trends and Google’s Keyword Planner to look for average monthly search volume for keywords related to your proposed course content. Are people actively looking for high-quality information about this subject? Of course, if you’re already creating content for a blog, coaching service, or a site like Medium, you can test demand this way for free just like Bryan did.
Whether it’s an important consumer application, a specialist app to solve a particular niche problem, or even a time-wasting game you can play on your phone, you can create a massively successful business if you build software that helps people. (Look at the rise of Slack—the team communication software that went from side project to billion-dollar company in just 2 years.)

When the economic change started in 2008, real estate attracted a lot of wealthy investors. Even today, buying, developing, and eventually selling a property is a sure way to acquire wealth. For instance, if you get a loan of around $200,000 and add your own $50,000 to buy a property that costs $250,000, then eventually sell it for $400,000, you can double your money easily.
Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card – Want an even bigger bonus? Consider the Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card instead. With this card, you’ll earn an amazing 50,000 points after you spend just $4,000 on your card within 90 days. If you turn in those points for cash, they are worth $500! Obviously, you’ll want to pay your balance in full to avoid interest. As long as you meet the minimum spending requirement, this $500 is yours to spend. Plus, this card comes with no annual fee.

The 50-30-20 rule is a great one to follow when it comes to budgeting. It’s broken down like this — 50% of your income should go towards living expenses (rent, utilities, transportation, and household necessities), 20% should go towards investments and financial goals (401k, other investments, and debts) and the last 30% is flexible spending money. Following this rule will ensure you’re not overspending or putting money somewhere it shouldn’t be.
Walk around your neighborhood or town and I’m sure you’ll see tons of great local businesses with terrible design. However, with increasingly easy-to-use tools like Adobe Illustrator, Venngage, Stencil, and Visme, just about anyone with a creative mindset and a good amount of motivation can start making money online by being a graphic designer for local companies.
Go hunting or foraging for food. You may need to invest in gear and permits, but if you already have these, this is an inexpensive way to get your own food. If you're ethically against the killing of animals, it's pretty easy to forage for food, depending on where you live. Just make sure to forage only for food whose origin and properties you are sure of. Getting sick or poisoned is never any fun.
How many email newsletters are you bombarded with every single day? There’s a reason for that. Marketing to an actively interested group of email subscribers is one of the best ways to make money online. There have even been million-dollar businesses built from simple email newsletters like TheSkimm, or Mister Spoils. Each newsletter targets a specific type of user with interesting, daily content, while also partnering with relevant companies and affiliates to bring in extra money. If this seems daunting, it’s not. Tools like MailChimp, ConvertKit and AWeber make it easier than ever to get started with email marketing. And another great option to consider (with the largest free plan available) is SendPulse, with their ability to send up to 15,000 emails per month to 2,500 subscribers, and then affordable plans starting at under $10/month as you grow from there.
Español: hacerte rico, Deutsch: Reich werden, Português: Ficar Rico, Nederlands: Rijk worden, Français: devenir riche, Italiano: Arricchirsi, Русский: стать богатым, 中文: 才能变得富有, Čeština: Jak zbohatnout, Bahasa Indonesia: Menjadi Kaya, 日本語: お金持ちになる, हिन्दी: अमीर बनें, العربية: أن تصبح غنيًا, Tiếng Việt: Trở nên Giàu có, 한국어: 부자가 되는 방법(미국), Türkçe: Nasıl Zengin Olunur
Successful investors also know not to put all of their money eggs in one basket — or two baskets, for that matter. They spread their wealth across a variety of investments, from stocks, mutual funds, ETFs and bonds, to real estate, collectibles and startups. A diversified portfolio means that you can potentially take advantage of multiple sources of growth and protect yourself from financial ruin if one of your investments bombs.
Next, you’ll need the right tools. You can be as complicated or simple as you want depending on your comfort with audio equipment, but at the minimum you’ll want a microphone and software for recording your voice. Companies like Behringer, Blue, Focusrite, and others sell studio-quality plug-and-play podcast setups that can get you recording today.
Protect yourself: In the end, you also need to protect yourself and your wealth, from yourself (doing something stupid with your savings) and others. Insurance, legal corporations, rainy day savings funds, tax shields and so on, there are many ways how you can protect yourself and your wealth. If you’re asking from what? From accidents, the government, market melts, sneaky salesmen and even from yourself is the answer.
Getty illustrated the purpose and value of having money. He reviews three different mentalities toward work, toward achieving and investing one's time. Basically, it's how you spend your time. Do you spend it working for other people, going home at the end of the day being like everyone else? Do you rise to the top, investing in what you do, in hopes that if your company succeeds, you do? Do you work for yourself? Create? Invest in yourself, for yourself? The book begged the question, "Who are you in terms of your values with wealth?" Very philosophical. Do you help others with it? Stockpile it and not help a soul? Do you blow it all? Do you save? It only means what it means to you. I like this book. I liked Getty.
One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. This is ever present in the sneaker world. I am an avid sneaker collector and a huge part of the culture is buying and selling your sneakers to keep updating your stock with your current favorites. I use a website called Kixify to buy and sell some of my sneakers and it is just like Ebay or Craigslist. Whenever I need money for whatever reason, I always look to see if I have a pair of shoes I am no longer in love with and willing to sell.

I couldn’t disagree more. The concept of systematic saving and hoping for a solid average return in the markets isn’t something that I believe in anymore. I’m 32, and have been investing in the markets since I was 18, under the assumption that if I set up automatic contributions throughout my life I would ultimately be “rich”. I started by maxing out my SEP-IRA and then by maxing my Roth. I invest monthly in a range of products, again, all with the goal of cost averaging the market to my benefit over time. Fast forward 14 years from when I began, and I have accumulated less than $60k. My invested dollar amount exceeds my current total, as it did even at the recent market highs in 2007. In other words, investing for the long haul doesn’t work like it used to, particularly for my generation. The first decade of wage earning is the most important in terms of compounding interest, and we have just experienced a completely lost decade. The hopes for recovery to make up for that lost decade (14 yrs in my case) do not appear reasonable. David
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