Yes, I went to bartending school after I graduated from college. When I didn’t get any job interviews, and my meager savings were drying up I needed a quick solution to make money for the rent. Five days later and $495 lighter, I graduated bartending school. I never poured a drink – I found a programming job the same week I was supposed to start bartending at a golf club.

I am hoping my success story involves a combination of the blog and consulting. I’ve been really struggling with the consulting lately in an attempt at networking and obtaining more clients. Between the two blogs, keeping up with industry, and maintaining an amicable family relationship I find I am short on time. My wife has not worked for over 2 years so we are on a single income. We do have a child who takes a lot of time and money.
We all wish we could be wealthy. For most of us, it's a far-off dream that someday, eventually, we might be able to turn ourselves into self-made millionaires. But the truth is, building wealth isn't about putting all your hopes into "someday." You're never too old to start building wealth, but if you start when you're young, you have far greater potential to amass a fortune--and more time to let that fortune compound itself as you grow older.

However, Clothier's tale is an epic one. He had succeeded almost his entire life, and from very early on. But when failure hit home and he was unable to recreate his arbitrage business on his own, the reality of the situation sunk in. With $4,000 left to his name, he happened upon an infomercial teaching real estate. It cost him $1,000 for that program, which was 25% of his net worth at the time. Petrified, he made the plunge.


My next self-funded business hit $160,000 in revenue in its first year alone. After that first taste of self-made success, I’ve gone on to sign consulting contracts worth tens of thousands of dollars with startups like LinkedIn and Google, launch profitable online courses, and build a following of hundreds of thousands for this blog and my podcast series.
You could try advertising more, for example, by putting up signs around the neighborhood, posting about it on social media, or having people you know spread the word. You could also try doing it in a different neighborhood that might have friendlier people, or do it in a time and place where there's likely to be a lot of people walking around the area (e.g., near a church before the end of a mass).
Very thorough and interesting list! I really loved this post and wanted to thank you for sharing, very helpful. I am fortunate enough to make a full-time income and support my family working from home, and I know many others who do as well. One thing I have realized working from home and making money online for years now is that the more people you genuinely help, the more money you end up making. Helping others to succeed will in turn create you a large following of loyal customers. If you have a loyal customer base and followers, you then have the perfect target audience for your business.
Choose your niche and check for demand: The golden course combination is when you can find an in-demand niche that aligns with your skills and unique experiences. A great way to do this is to use Google Trends and Google’s Keyword Planner to look for average monthly search volume for keywords related to your proposed course content. Are people actively looking for high-quality information about this subject? Of course, if you’re already creating content for a blog, coaching service, or a site like Medium, you can test demand this way for free just like Bryan did.
What It Is: Transcription essentially involves you listening to audio files and typing out what you hear. Easy enough, right? Companies usually hire transcriptionists without much experience, so some job postings might only require you to have a computer and keyboard to get started. Transcription jobs can vary from transcribing a college lecture to a doctor's medical dictation, while most companies allow you to make your own schedule.

The job: If you’re looking for a flexible, independent way to earn money — and you love hanging out with dogs — Rover might be your perfect gig. The online network connects dog walkers and sitters to local dog owners through its 4.9-star-rated app, so you don’t have to staple flyers on every utility pole across town. You can choose to offer a variety of services, including dog walking, overnight boarding at your home or theirs, and daycare.
What a huge, great list of ideas – bookmarked this as I know I’ll be coming back to go over it again and again. Here’s another item that could have made the list. I found a financial directory that’s useful for info on making money online. It’s http://money.madbeetech.com. What I like about it is that each directory listing includes ebooks and videos that can be instantly downloaded. All sorts of stuff for people who have their own website, and people who don’t (but still want to make money online).
Borrowing could be a key element in this method. Say you borrow $200,000 and put in $50,000 of your own to buy a property for $250,000. Then you develop the property and sell it for $400,000. The property has increased in value by 60% but your $50,000 has now grown fourfold to $200,000. You have to select the right properties in the right areas and develop them wisely.
Ebates is another cash back app, similar to Dosh, and right now they are offering a $10 signup bonus. There’s no rule saying you can’t have multiple cash back apps, so why not sign up for a couple just so you get the bonuses? Once you get your bonuses, then just use whichever app gets you the best deal on your upcoming purchases. Easiest money ever!
Of course, these steps are pushing you towards a rich and successful future, but that doesn’t mean you won’t fail once or twice. You might put your money in an investment and it flops. You might put time towards building your personal brand to have it struggle to get off the ground. But that doesn’t mean you should throw in the towel and give up. These are just small obstacles that you will have to overcome before it gets easier and begins coming more naturally. That being said, prepare to fail. It’s the only way to know what you’re doing right and what you’re doing wrong so you don’t have to make the same mistakes again.
Do you search the Internet? Want to get paid for it? Swagbucks is a site that rewards you for doing various online tasks like taking surveys, watching videos, and using their search engine. When using their search engine, you get reward points after several searches, usually in the amount of 10-15 points. You can start cashing out rewards at the 500 points mark.

the problem with “CashCrate” is that the amount of money that u get out of it is VERY slim.. and even to get that VERY slim portion of money you have to complete a lot of surveys and to cash-in on the money you earned u must make over $20, trust me. i tried it, it took me over 6-12 months to get the cash.. i used the site like if my life depended on it. it was very hard.
As a financial adviser, I occasionally find myself feeling envious of certain clients. Not because of their wealth — but because of their discipline. They were determined enough to do all the right things which enabled them to accumulate their wealth and, in many cases, retire early. Despite my expertise, I, like a lot of people, sometimes struggle not to do the wrong things that make being rich, let alone retiring at all, a pipe dream.
Wells Fargo is offering an all-around terrific credit card that hits high notes in every category. The Wells Fargo Cash Wise Visa® Card includes a $200 cash rewards bonus after spending $1,000 in the first three months, 1.5% cash back on all purchases, a 0% intro APR on purchases and qualifying balance transfers for 12 months AND added benefits like cell phone protection. Read review

Avoid purchases that are likely to depreciate rapidly. Spending $50,000 on a car is sometimes considered a waste because it's likely that it won't be worth half that much in five years, regardless of how much work you put into it. As soon as you drive a new car off the lot, it depreciates about 20%-25% in value and continues to do so each year you own it. [2] That makes buying a car a very important financial decision.


Millionaires are all around us, and many of them are probably not who you would think. This is because they smartly live below their means and save their money rather than showcase it. Of course, it’s easy to live below your means when you have millions, but even if you have far less, getting into the habit of spending minimally now will help you have a lot more later. The trick is adopting a “less is more” mentality and sticking with it, even when your income and net worth increase in the future.
This is a true classic in my opinion on not merely how to get rich but how to be rich as the title suggests.Mr.Getty espouses the inherent believe or rather conviction that wealth is far greater than what price a person put's upon himself or the principles that govern this thought but that as a man values himself is the ultimate litmus of his true worth.
I couldn’t disagree more. The concept of systematic saving and hoping for a solid average return in the markets isn’t something that I believe in anymore. I’m 32, and have been investing in the markets since I was 18, under the assumption that if I set up automatic contributions throughout my life I would ultimately be “rich”. I started by maxing out my SEP-IRA and then by maxing my Roth. I invest monthly in a range of products, again, all with the goal of cost averaging the market to my benefit over time. Fast forward 14 years from when I began, and I have accumulated less than $60k. My invested dollar amount exceeds my current total, as it did even at the recent market highs in 2007. In other words, investing for the long haul doesn’t work like it used to, particularly for my generation. The first decade of wage earning is the most important in terms of compounding interest, and we have just experienced a completely lost decade. The hopes for recovery to make up for that lost decade (14 yrs in my case) do not appear reasonable. David
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