It’s also a good time to take advantage of the gig economy. Can you play an instrument, repair clocks, tutor someone in math, plan a party, paint signs, repair decks, or write calligraphy? Think far and wide about what you’re good at, and write an ad for yourself. Chances are, someone out there needs your expertise, no matter how small or inconsequential you consider your talents to be.

If you’re serious about becoming rich, you’re going to need to step out of your comfort zone and recognize that the path to success is through uncertainty. Traditional paths, like having a steady job and a fixed check, are safer, but wealth often comes through taking calculated risks. Don’t let fear hold you back. If you dream of something more, learn to embrace different possibilities.
Not quite ready to start your own blog, but still like the idea of getting paid to write? You may want to consider trying your hand at freelance writing. Many bloggers and website owners are willing to shell out some serious cash for high quality writers. In fact, Holly Johnson from ClubThrifty.com makes over $200,000 per year from freelance work! And she has a course that teaches others how to do the same.
Once you are all set up, Live Ops has an excellent online training program that teaches you how to handle calls from customers. You will be taking calls for many different companies. When you start working, your phone will ring and a script will pop up on your screen. You simply read the script word for word and input customer information as you go along. If customers have questions, there is a section on your screen with FAQ’s and you are also logged into a virtual chat room should you need to ask for support from a supervisor.
Another benefit of giving to charity is that people perceive you as a better person when you give to causes they care about. They are likely to trust you more when they see that you aren’t intent on hoarding the money they give you, and that doing so will benefit their community in turn. Of course, the tax benefits of giving to charity are also a great incentive to do so.
I advocate for the Tim Ferris, multiple income stream strategy. It’s important to have a diversified portfolio and automatic income streams that supplement your basic income earned through work. Selecting the best investment and income streams requires a person do the research, but very basic strategies can be employed that grow the money nest. I think the article is right to say it’s better to earn rather than save more than you spend, because saving money can depend on very specific contexts, while earning money tends to be more predictive. Good article.
If you want to help shape digital products in their early stages, joining an online focus group or answering survey questions is a great way to make extra money online. They don’t pay as much as some of the other options we’ve highlighted, but you can join groups on sites like Survey Junkie, Swagbucks, and IPSOS that pay out through Amazon gift cards, check, or PayPal. You’ll be asked to provide a bit of information about your demographics (age, location, etc…), but after that you can get going making money through surveys.
Save money on food. I recently joined $5 Meal Plan in order to help me eat at home more and cut my food spending. It’s only $5 a month and you get meal plans sent straight to you along with the exact shopping list you need in order to create the meals. Each meal costs around $2 per person or less. This allows you to save time because you won’t have to meal plan anymore, and it will save you money as well!
Earn the experience through different levels of work and when you feel like you have gained all that you can from it, consider moving on in other companies would widen your horizon on different business cultures. Putting more experiences in various positions would make you a more valuable asset for companies and making you a better option for higher rank duties.

Selling clothes you no longer wear is a quick way to make some money. Start with local consignment shops for faster cash, or use sites like ThredUp and Poshmark to find buyers. If you go the online route, be sure to take clear, well-lit photos of your pieces and research similar items to set competitive prices. Get tips on how to sell your clothing.
I have a Master’s in Nursing and experience as a Chief Nursing Officer, Case Manager and so much more. My problem is I’m disgusted with healthcare and nursing. Absolutely tired of the whole industry, but I feel stuck and I’m ten years in. I make $100K plus a year and am the sole provider for my family. What options are out there that I could use my degree in or transition my degree by getting a certificate or something similar? I’m of course even more open to something I can do and replicate my income without having to have additional education!
I fear your wonderful advice comes too late for me. I am 58 years old and have no job skills. The world is a wonderful place for you young people who have jobs and a meaningful life, but for someone like me it is difficult to want to keep going. I feel antiquated and out-of-date. I will never be a millionaire–not even close! What is even worse is that my two grown sons can only find part-time, minimum wage jobs and both of them went to college.

It's really easy to look at certain strategies and techniques in business or in life that will help you make monumental leaps forward, financially speaking. But that doesn't take into account one of the most important ingredients for success. If you're serious about succeeding at the highest level, be grateful. Not tomorrow. Not in a few weeks when you get a raise. Right now. In this very moment. Why? Because it could all disappear in an instant. Appreciate what you have while striving for more.


Jeff have you ever considered adding something on price comparison sites for selling your used stuff? One of the fastest 100 bucks I have made so far was just from old textbooks and dvds on price comparison sites that give you the best offers. I know Bonavendi.com is a good but im sure there are others. Anyway would be interesting to see your take on the matter, the other ideas I found really creative though. Thanks for the read brother


Do you constantly come up with witty one-liners? Do you dream of the days of Mad Men-style advertising? If you’ve got some branding chops or just come up with imaginative copy, there are lots of opportunities to make money online through company naming and slogan contests. If you think you have a knack for names check out the Squadhelp platform where you can earn a little extra money online by naming brands, services, products, company slogans and even help out on the logo design front if you've got the chops.
But once you’re in your home office—alone, every day—you might start to miss that collegial camaraderie. Since the UPS incident, I’ve reached out more to colleagues via IM and will post cute pics of my new puppy for my colleagues to see on Yammer. And when we’re on deadline, we even (gasp!) talk on the phone. It’s helped tremendously to make the disconnect not feel so severe. It’s a good balance between having peace and quiet when you need it and much-needed interaction with others, too.
I couldn’t disagree more. The concept of systematic saving and hoping for a solid average return in the markets isn’t something that I believe in anymore. I’m 32, and have been investing in the markets since I was 18, under the assumption that if I set up automatic contributions throughout my life I would ultimately be “rich”. I started by maxing out my SEP-IRA and then by maxing my Roth. I invest monthly in a range of products, again, all with the goal of cost averaging the market to my benefit over time. Fast forward 14 years from when I began, and I have accumulated less than $60k. My invested dollar amount exceeds my current total, as it did even at the recent market highs in 2007. In other words, investing for the long haul doesn’t work like it used to, particularly for my generation. The first decade of wage earning is the most important in terms of compounding interest, and we have just experienced a completely lost decade. The hopes for recovery to make up for that lost decade (14 yrs in my case) do not appear reasonable. David
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