With the economic crisis, people are happy to have any kind of job, even the ones that don't pay well. However, there are challenging jobs where you will be assigned in places where living is hard because of the climate, crime rate, and civil unrest. Jobs like this will reward you with a six-figure salary and free housing, as well as, travel opportunities.
Great message, Jeff. When I look at big goals, or even incremental goals, I like to break them down into bite size bits. Earning $100,000 a year seems difficult in many situations, but it seems easier when you break it down to $8,350 a month, or roughly $280 a day. Sure, that is aggressive for many salaries, but there are many ways to fill the gaps with side income, owning a small business, consulting, freelance work, etc. The same concept works for any number or goal you want to reach. Find out where you are, and what it will take to reach the next step. It’s much more attainable when you make incremental goals.


What are the best ways to make money right away? While a search online when you're in need of some fast cash will produce millions of results, not all will be legitimate. It's up to you to filter through the so-called noise. These 32 strategies will help put you in the black, even if it's in a very small way. Once you are, resume planning and focusing on the bigger picture. 
Check with your local bank to see if they're giving away cash bonuses for opening up accounts. Banks run promotions like this all the time, so grab some real cash quickly if you're in need. It won't break the bank (no pun intended) but it will give you a quick $50 or $100 -- maybe even more -- when you really need it. You might need to deposit a minimum amount of cash (usually in the thousands) in order to qualify for these types of accounts (but not always).
Avoid purchases that are likely to depreciate rapidly. Spending $50,000 on a car is sometimes considered a waste because it's likely that it won't be worth half that much in five years, regardless of how much work you put into it. As soon as you drive a new car off the lot, it depreciates about 20%-25% in value and continues to do so each year you own it. [2] That makes buying a car a very important financial decision.
When an airplane leaves from one city to the next, it has a plan. Its plan is called a flight plan. It's a massive action plan that involves speed, altitude, direction of travel and many other facets. But what happens when there's turbulence or air-traffic congestion or it needs to change course for some other reason? The plane changes its plan. But it doesn't change its goal of where it's going. Create and follow a plan, and don't be afraid to change it if you see something isn't working.
401k: Be sure to take advantage of your employer’s 401k plan by putting at least enough money to collect the employer match into it. This basically means that for every dollar you contribute, your company will match that (pre-tax!). This ensures you’re taking full advantage of what is essentially free money from your employer. That match is POWERFUL and can double your money over the course of your working life:
Transcribe Anywhere is a great course for aspiring transcription professionals looking to turn their work-from-home dreams into reality. The course covers the essential technical skills every transcriptionist needs, including time-saving tools to boost your efficiency. You’ll also learn how to find work and build your at-home business from the ground up. Get started with a free introductory transcription course by following the link above.
I came a low income single mother home. I earned two bachelors degrees, but had no car and no job to afford one. That killed my chances of working in either desired field after college. I worked part time for twelve years locally at a company, then was downsized. Mom died and I had to get an apartment. Still not enough money to risk getting a car when it could take from a month’s rent or more… that much closer to being out on the street with my belongings gone. I am really hopeful I can find something legitimate.
With $2 million dollars still in the bank, he thought he was invincible. Fast forward 22 months later, and with just $4,000 left in his account, the walls were closing in on him. I'm all-to familiar with that feeling of despair and anxiety, of sheer and utter pain and panic, that it really hit home for me, as I know it does for others. The truth is that it's easy to make friends when you're riding high, but when you fall from grace and everyone around you disappears, you realize the importance of things like family and health over monetary achievements.
×