Great message, Jeff. When I look at big goals, or even incremental goals, I like to break them down into bite size bits. Earning $100,000 a year seems difficult in many situations, but it seems easier when you break it down to $8,350 a month, or roughly $280 a day. Sure, that is aggressive for many salaries, but there are many ways to fill the gaps with side income, owning a small business, consulting, freelance work, etc. The same concept works for any number or goal you want to reach. Find out where you are, and what it will take to reach the next step. It’s much more attainable when you make incremental goals.
A wide range of businesses need workers to enter various data into their systems, whether that data are used to track inventory or shipments, create business plans, or measure performance or output. And since a computer and typing skills are the most important requirements for this job, many data entry workers are able to work at home, and on a schedule that fits their lives.
Online teaching jobs can be found at a number of different websites across the web. If you’re interested in TEFL jobs, VIPKID, Gogokid, EF Education First, and Hawo American Academy are legit sites to look for jobs. For general tutoring, websites like Tutor.com and Varsity Tutors are good places to start. Keep in mind that you’ll likely need to complete a video interview before being hired.
If you're running on fumes, financially speaking, but you have some money coming your way soon, consider pawning something of value to borrow fast cash. Of course, to get those items back you'll need to pay back the loan with interest. If you don't pay it back in time, that you'll lose the item. If it's really something that has a lot of intrinsic value to you, don't do it. But if it's something that doesn't, you can certainly consider it depending on your situation.
You may be dumb in one field but you can be great in another. A fish always feels dumber watching a monkey climb a tree so easily and knowing that it could not climb. Find a field where you can be good. Everybody is good at something. Bad grades do not necessarily mean that you cannot get rich. Getting rich requires financial and economic knowledge, it doesn't necessarily matter how or what you have studied.
Choose the right location. Go where the good jobs are. If you want to pursue finance, for example, there are far greater opportunities in big cities than in rural, low-populated areas. If you want to build a startup, you'll probably want to consider going to Silicon Valley. If you want to make it big in the entertainment industry, go to LA or New York City.
We've all heard the saying. Pay yourself first. But how many people follow it? The truth is that most of the world lives with a scarcity mentality. They go paycheck to paycheck, petrified of what might occur if they get sick or lose their job or something else traumatic happens. The truth is that if you don't pay yourself first, you'll never be able to get rich. It's part of having an abundant mindset and should be prioritized at all costs.
Tenants sounds good, but can be a toxic problem as I recall before of one studying Religion and Ministry somewhere and claimed to be clean and laid back, but came to light by another tenant he stayed with to have a bad temper, bad attitude and never clean up his own dishes and have his stuff scattered in living room without first discussing with his roommate and always asked other roomie for rides and money as a moocher and would get pushy if his roomie refused as unable to at times.
×