For instance, they offer 50 cents if you upload a picture of a receipt where you bought milk and offer $10 for a picture of a Best Buy receipt. Of course, it makes no sense going out and purposefully buying products with the highest rebate, yet it won’t take much of your time taking and uploading pictures of things you typically buy and stash some extra cash by the end of the month.

Goals inspire us, motivate us and give us purpose. Many of us have common goals, such as paying off debt, buying a house and retiring by a certain age. Maybe you have another goal of starting your own business or buying a second home. Unfortunately, goals are easily overshadowed by the daily stresses of life and all too often forgotten and neglected. When goals are just fleeting thoughts in your mind, they lose their meaning and influence over your behavior. This leads to bad financial habits, and your dream of becoming rich stays just that — a dream.

Track down your expenses. To soar your efficiency on cutting your expenses, it is vital to keep track of them. Pick one of the numerous expense tracking applications there are around, like Money Lover or Mint, and record every single penny that goes in and out of your wallet. After 3 months or so, you should be able to know where most of your money go and what can you do for that.
That being said, life in your 20s and 30s is not without its challenges; you might have student debt, a tenuous career, and dozens of unknowns that keep you from doing everything you'd like to build your wealth faster. There's no straightforward way to guarantee yourself a rich future, but these seven strategies can help you do it while you're still young.

Jean Paul Getty was an American industrialist and founder of the Getty Oil Company. In 1957 Fortune magazine named him the richest living American, and the 1966 Guinness Book of Records named him the world’s richest private citizen, worth nearly 9 billion dollars in today’s money. He was the author of several books, including the bestselling How to Be Rich, and his autobiography, As I See It. He died in 1976.
Social networks are a hot spot for work-at-home danger. One company called Easy Tweet Profits claims you can make up to $873/day online. They even claim one person earned $400,000/year using their method of tweeting your way to success. The catch? By signing up for their program you agree to be charged just under $50 per month! There are a whole host of other companies with similar names (usually involving “make money” or “make profits”) that suggest social networking can be a cash cow. But their game is all the same: Whether you’re talking about something you see on Craigslist, eBay, Facebook, Twitter or whatever’s the next hot thing, you’ve got to be wary.

One of the most common questions I hear is, how to make money fast? Maybe you’re faced with an unexpected home repair, or your car decided to call it quits and now you’re in the need for some extra cash quick, fast and in hurry (like yesterday). If you are looking to make money on the side, then you will need to be careful, there a lot of “get rich quick” schemes and work at home scams.
I received a call from a company in March of 2003 here in Brazil from one of the owners of the company that wanted to import from China but could not speak English. I started to help him import Chemicals for his company which when I started to work for him was worth USD2 million. Today 7 years later I am worth with savings and assets around USD800,000 and pushing towards my first Million.
Noticeably absent from my list is “blogging”. I enjoy blogging and sharing with readers ways to save money, inspiring success stories and of course geek culture. However, blogging is not the path to quick money online. Despite what many bloggers and peddlers of courses may suggest, blogging is very hard work and it takes a sizable audience to make even a modest return.
Hi Danielle – I presume you have a website or blog? If so, the easiest way to start is by signing up for an affiliate site, like Commission Junction. They represent hundreds of companies offering affiliate programs. But you can also contact companies directly, preferably those who’s products and services you actually use. Most company’s have affiliate programs now, so you can try signing up that way. They’ll give you a coded link to place on your site that will credit you for the sale when a reader clicks through to their site and makes a purchase.
Websites like Survey Junkie will pay you a decent chunk of change for the low-maintenance, borderline mindless task of completing surveys. Companies want to understand consumers better, and one way they do that is by compensating survey-takers. Most surveys pay between $0.50 and $1.25, and many of them take less than 5 minutes to do. You can read our full Survey Junkie review for more info.

I am hoping my success story involves a combination of the blog and consulting. I’ve been really struggling with the consulting lately in an attempt at networking and obtaining more clients. Between the two blogs, keeping up with industry, and maintaining an amicable family relationship I find I am short on time. My wife has not worked for over 2 years so we are on a single income. We do have a child who takes a lot of time and money.
The first follows the startup path we outlined above: You have a disruptive idea for an app or piece of software, you validate the idea with real customers, and then raise money to hire developers or a development studio to build, launch, and scale your software. If you’ve done everything right, your software will be accepted to the Apple and Google Stores and you’ll make money every time someone downloads it or pays for a premium feature.

With Shopkick, there’s no purchase necessary to earn cash back. In order to make money with Shopkick, all you have to do is download the app, enable your location services, and start earning kicks. You’ll earn points just by walking into a store, and even more points for scanning items or making a purchase. Payout comes in the form of gift cards to your favorite stores, including Walmart, Target, Sephora, and Starbucks to name a few.
This is a true classic in my opinion on not merely how to get rich but how to be rich as the title suggests.Mr.Getty espouses the inherent believe or rather conviction that wealth is far greater than what price a person put's upon himself or the principles that govern this thought but that as a man values himself is the ultimate litmus of his true worth.
I surprisingly get a lot of people asking to detail their car. I never intend to make a business of it, but I love doing it to my cars and people ask me to do it to theirs. All it takes is a cheap orbital buffer (mines a used craftsman) and a shop vac. I normally get easily $100 for a basic wash/wax/vac, or $200 to remove scratches and polish then wax the car.
Getty illustrated the purpose and value of having money. He reviews three different mentalities toward work, toward achieving and investing one's time. Basically, it's how you spend your time. Do you spend it working for other people, going home at the end of the day being like everyone else? Do you rise to the top, investing in what you do, in hopes that if your company succeeds, you do? Do you work for yourself? Create? Invest in yourself, for yourself? The book begged the question, "Who are you in terms of your values with wealth?" Very philosophical. Do you help others with it? Stockpile it and not help a soul? Do you blow it all? Do you save? It only means what it means to you. I like this book. I liked Getty.
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