Blogging is something that requires patience, persistence and discipline. It may mean writing everyday for over a year before you really start to see any money from it. There are exceptions to the rule, but from my dealings with other bloggers, it seems to be pretty common to spend one or even two years building your blog, your brand and your authority, before making any serious amount of money.
More and more companies and startups especially are embracing remote work—where you use online collaboration and communication tools to do your work from wherever you want. And you don’t have to be a 20-something hotshot designer or coder to reap the benefits of working remotely. Many remote positions are for customer support positions or other customer-facing positions that don’t require specialized skill sets.
How much will you make? I think my best month with Google AdSense was almost $5,000 over the last ten years. That amazing month blew my mind since it was actually near the beginning of my blogging journey. When you go from making zero to $5,000 in a month, that will rock your world. For me, it also got me even more excited because I knew there were other ways to monetize.
Being a Loan Signing Agent is a great side hustle because you can make $75 to $200 per hour-long appointment working for yourself on your own schedule. Retired people, working professionals, and students can be signing agents and earn extra cash when they want. The best part is you need nothing more than a notary commission (which can often be attained by simply filling out an application)!
If you’ve got expertise in a certain area, package up your knowledge into an online course and sell it. This has become a very popular business model for online entrepreneurs over the past several years. The two big websites that are used to sell online courses are Udemy and Teachable. Check out this awesome article by Regina on How to Create an Online Course that Sells.
You can either organize a yard sale yourself (which is kind of a hassle), or better sell the items through ThredUp, which will pay somewhere around $2-$25 for staff from Gap, Banana Republic, H&M, etc. You can browse around to see how much different items are worth. The best thing about ThredUp is that all you need to do is pack your clothes in a box and then just ship it to them (shipping costs are covered by the company).
Noticeably absent from my list is “blogging”. I enjoy blogging and sharing with readers ways to save money, inspiring success stories and of course geek culture. However, blogging is not the path to quick money online. Despite what many bloggers and peddlers of courses may suggest, blogging is very hard work and it takes a sizable audience to make even a modest return.
I have always subscribed to paying yourself first, keeping debt under control and living within my means. Fortunately my wife and I have always made pretty good money so it was fairly pain free to be successful. We were so fortunate to not have any breaks in our work history which is a huge factor. For those who need to dip into savings to cover a long period of work outage, it can be devastating. I’m now at retirement age, house is paid for, no debt, million++ in investments…. You don’t know good it feels to be able to sleep good at night knowing that you can deal with anything that comes up.
I started reading your e-newsletter since I found out about you from Mo Money Podcast. I love this content and I can tell you what my side hustle is that was not mentioned here. I have been a virtual translator via Upwork (freelancing platform). Since I’m originally from Japan, I started offering beginner to intermediate level translation last year. Since then, I have delivered over 6 dozens projects all satisfactorily. I like that each and every project is so unique and it really stimulates my brain and challenge myself to deliver high quality translation services. My hope is that one day when I get pregnant or want to stay home with my babies, I can just do this freelancing job and quit my 9-5 job. Upwork offers so many types of freelancing jobs other than translation, so I recommend to anyone who wants to capitalize their underutilized talents.
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